Garment workers are regularly exploited at factories in South India, BBC reports

Garment-workers-are-regularly-exploited-at-factories-in-South-India

Workers in garment factories supplying goods for big brands including Marks and Spencer, Tesco, Ralph Lauren, and Sainsbury’s have stood up against the more obscure side of the flickering fashion industry, guaranteeing “slave-type working conditions” with extended hours and low wages in India.

Workers in garment factories supplying goods for big brands including Marks and Spencer, Tesco, Ralph Lauren, and Sainsbury’s have stood up against the more obscure side of the flickering fashion industry, guaranteeing “slave-type working conditions” with extended hours and low wages in India.

Many brands were stunned by the BBC report on laborers’ abuse and that they were going to launch a quick survey into their supplier’s work conditions and treatment. In an interview with the BBC, which previously revealed the female workers’ worries, ladies in a rural section of South India stated that they were frequently exposed to abuse by factory proprietors and supervisors. They were constrained to work late into the night and now and then rest on the floor to reach targets. 

These sorts of brands don’t claim or control factories in India, which creates a lot of distance between them and working conditions there, yet one owner of a garments factory, who wished to be anonymous – told the BBC that if brands accelerate for less expensive garments it can leave suppliers with no option except for to compromise to meet deadlines.

The covid-19 pandemic has very strongly hit the Asia-Pacific region’s garment sector. The disease surged like a terrible tsunami for the industry, and it produced a huge blow to the demand and supply. A lot of garment workers have lost their jobs since the nationwide lockdown rules. 

Few women who talked to the BBC, fear of repercussions, kept their identity secret, said they were not given washroom breaks and time to drink water or have lunch because of stir accumulating work. “They’ve expanded our workload. We’re forced to stay overtime to complete it – or the manager yells at us and threatens to fire us. We’re frightened as we would prefer not to lose our positions,” one lady revealed. 

It isn’t the first time that concerns have been raised about working conditions for ladies in garment factories in South Asia has exposed. A report by Global Labor Justice found that in Asian nations including Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and Indonesia, women consisted of 80 to 95 percent. 

The BBC report revealed how these ladies were exposed to verbal and actual exploitation and abuse, while a female worker in a study professed to have been beaten by a male boss for not reaching her target. 

However, many International brands consider India as the world’s second-biggest producer, and exporter of the clothing industry, a worthwhile market for cheaper manufacturing costs. 

In the BBC report, the three brands stated that they were going to examine the issue and that they were worried about the working states of the ladies. 

Marks and Spencer said that they have paid attention to the claims and promptly requested an unannounced audit of the site in India. Moreover, the brand discredited charges that laborers were denied admittance to water or restrooms. 

An M&S representative disclosed to BBC that they have paid attention to these charges very seriously. While there was positively no proof that the laborers were denied basic rights. We found extra time working practices that are not fair. As a mindful retailer, we have an obligation of care to ensure the occupations of the individuals that work in our supply chain,” he added. 

Sainsbury’s, the second-biggest general store chain in the UK, said it was stunned by such upsetting reports and launched a quick examination at the production line. 

Ralph Lauren told the BBC it would explore the charges.

We require the entirety of our providers to satisfy severe working guidelines to guarantee a protected, solid, and moral working environment, and we direct the third-party audits at all production lines

the organization said in a statement

The fashion industry carries more attention since it’s driven by exports and controls a portion of the world’s greatest brands among its customers. India is the world’s second-biggest exporter and manufacturer of fashion clothing after China. India’s clothing industry directly utilizes about 12.9 million individuals in factories and millions more outside, including home workers, as per a 2019 report that examined working conditions in the region. 

The BBC report seems to show that India’s Factories Act, which expresses that no laborer ought to surpass over 48 hours every week (or 60 hours with additional time), nor should they be made to work for over nine hours in a single day, is not adhering to the law.

Article Credit: The BBC/ The Reuters/ The Guardian/ HRW

Senior Reporter

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